Sep
27
6:30pm 6:30pm

Peer Review Critique

The Wednesday night sessions have been very successful. Experienced photographers are sharpening their skills, aspiring photographers are learning from the more experienced. Everyone is sharing their knowledge and support - some natural born teachers are seeing their abilities develop. 
The Saturday sessions are an attempt to offer this unique critique to more people throughout the Bay Area.

Ten people Maximum
Five presenters Maximum - Ten images each - Fee per presenter is $10.00

Over the past few years, I have had many students ask, “What is a good photograph?” This is a very complicated question and the process is often very murky. 

The complicated part: 
Photography is a wonderful art form that can be either crystal clear and sharp, such as in photojournalism, or oblique, ethereal and textual.

The murky part: 
1. Most “masters/experts” are mostly bluster and belittle a person’s work because they don’t have the photography or communication skills to discuss the photographs constructively. This beat down can easily break the spirit of the emerging artist.

2. There are organizations who judge a photographers’ work based on clear razor-edged rules that force the artist into a box. Too often these “reviews” are led someone who may or may not be qualified, are very brief and offer few constructive comments.

3. There is the Salon, which is typically a small group that reinforces their own particular approach and does little more than massage the "select" members egos.

The answer part: 
There is a tested, tried and true approach that I have personally seen work many many times – that is a structured peer review and critique. SF Camerawork’s member review/critiques are the template for these Peer review/critiques. 
The experience of hearing the wide-ranging points of view from the group and the director helps a person understand what constitutes a good photograph and how to enhance their own work.

Space is limited = To register as a presenter please go to the attached link.

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Sep
30
3:30pm 3:30pm

Canon Fundamentals

The Fundamentals of the Craft and Art of Digital Photography +  A hands-on working with your Canon camera

A Maximum of Five Students 
A two-hour class beginning promptly at 1:30 and will run through 3:30


Includes a handout for the class, a guide for your camera, an "everything you ever needed to know about photography" cheat sheet.  
Cost: $50.00

All Fundamentals classes will only be taught by Glen Graves founder of PhotoArts Marin. These are the building blocks for beginning to understand and master this wonderful art form. 

At this time I have taught over a thousand students in small or private classes on the Fundamentals of Digital photography.  My frustration is the same as most of theirs.  Because of the class size and diversity of cameras, we rarely get to how to make successful images with the student's camera.  The difference between Nikon and Canon is substantial and the mirrorless, such as the Sony, require hours of private instruction.  As a result, these classes are very small and very experiential/hands on.  

The Fundamentals workshop covers why it is very important to ignore 90% of what your camera manual says that your camera can do and understand how to use that very valuable 10% to create high-quality images. 

We will cover how to use the camera's auto and scene settings and why it is important to use the camera's manual settings.  

Space is limited = To register please go to the attached link.

 

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Sep
23
1:30pm 1:30pm

Nikon Fundamentals

The Fundamentals of the Craft and Art of Digital Photography +  A hands-on working with your Nikon camera

A Maximum of Five Students 
A two-hour class beginning promptly at 1:30 and will run through 3:30


Includes a handout for the class, a guide for your camera, an "everything you ever needed to know about photography" cheat sheet.  
Cost: $50.00

All Fundamentals classes will only be taught by Glen Graves founder of PhotoArts Marin. These are the building blocks for beginning to understand and master this wonderful art form. 

At this time I have taught over a thousand students in small or private classes on the Fundamentals of Digital photography.  My frustration is the same as most of theirs.  Because of the class size and diversity of cameras, we rarely get to how to make successful images with the student's camera.  The difference between Nikon and Canon is substantial and the mirrorless, such as the Sony, require hours of private instruction.  As a result, these classes are very small and very experiential/hands on.  

The Fundamentals workshop covers why it is very important to ignore 90% of what your camera manual says that your camera can do and understand how to use that very valuable 10% to create high-quality images. 

We will cover how to use the camera's auto and scene settings and why it is important to use the camera's manual settings.  

Space is limited = To register please go to the attached link.

 

View Event →
Sep
23
10:30am10:30am

Peer Review Critique

The Wednesday night sessions have been very successful. Experienced photographers are sharpening their skills, aspiring photographers are learning from the more experienced. Everyone is sharing their knowledge and support - some natural born teachers are seeing their abilities develop. 
The Saturday sessions are an attempt to offer this unique critique to more people throughout the Bay Area.

Ten people Maximum
Five presenters Maximum - Ten images each - Fee per presenter is $10.00

Over the past few years, I have had many students ask, “What is a good photograph?” This is a very complicated question and the process is often very murky. 

The complicated part: 
Photography is a wonderful art form that can be either crystal clear and sharp, such as in photojournalism, or oblique, ethereal and textual.

The murky part: 
1. Most “masters/experts” are mostly bluster and belittle a person’s work because they don’t have the photography or communication skills to discuss the photographs constructively. This beat down can easily break the spirit of the emerging artist.

2. There are organizations who judge a photographers’ work based on clear razor-edged rules that force the artist into a box. Too often these “reviews” are led someone who may or may not be qualified, are very brief and offer few constructive comments.

3. There is the Salon, which is typically a small group that reinforces their own particular approach and does little more than massage the "select" members egos.

The answer part: 
There is a tested, tried and true approach that I have personally seen work many many times – that is a structured peer review and critique. SF Camerawork’s member review/critiques are the template for these Peer review/critiques. 
The experience of hearing the wide-ranging points of view from the group and the director helps a person understand what constitutes a good photograph and how to enhance their own work.

Space is limited = To register as a presenter please go to the attached link.

View Event →
Jul
26
8:30pm 8:30pm

Photography Peer Review / Critique

The purpose of the Review/Critique:
For someone who has experience in photography, knows their subject and recognizes their style, these reviews/critiques are valuable for working to fine tune a project or answer a specific question.  For someone who is new to photography, these reviews/critiques are valuable to find out how their work resonates with others and to begin to see where this art is going to lead them. Answering the question of “What is a good photograph?” can be a challenge at best. 

Over the past few years, I have had many students ask, “What is a good photograph?” This is a very complicated question and the process is often very murky.  

The complicated part: 
Photography is a wonderful art form that can be either crystal clear and sharp, such as in photojournalism, or oblique, ethereal and textual.  One has a message that is almost impossible to avoid and the other communicates an emotion, a feeling. Both approaches and the range in between are legitimate and are the foundation for many great photographs.  

The murky part: 
Some “experts” are mostly bluster and disparage a person’s work because they don’t have the photography skills or communication skills to discuss it constructively.  This beat down often breaks the spirit of the emerging artist.

There are organizations who judge a photographers’ work based on clear razor-edged rules that force the artist into a box.  Too often these “reviews” are very brief and offer few constructive comments by someone who may or may not be qualified. 

There is the Salon, which is typically a small group that reinforces their own particular approach.

The answer part:
There is a tested, tried and true approach that I have personally seen work many many times – that is a structured peer review and critique. SF Camerawork’s member review/critiques are the template for these Peer review/critiques.

These Peer review/critiques will be structured as follows:

  1. Five to six photographers will display their prints or digital images. The number they want to submit can range from a few up to fifteen. 
  2. Each photographer talks about their process - challenges - goals.  Then the group discusses how they feel about the craft and art of work. 
  3. The person directing the review/critique has the experience to knowingly comment constructively on the work. 
  4. All comments by the group and the director are respectful, insightful and help the photographer artist address their questions and goals and if something needs work it will be discussed.

The experience of hearing the wide-ranging points of view from the group and the director helps a person understand what constitutes a good photograph and how to enhance their own work.  

Attendees will be limited to fifteen people with a max of six people showing. The cost to show is $10.00.  Please contact Glen Graves to secure your time. 415-450-1079


Photography Peer Review/Critique
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Jul
8
1:00pm 1:00pm

Mindfulness / Visualize MeetUp

Over the past year or so a lot has been written re Mindfulness as it applies to photography.  Mindfulness is achieved when a photographer makes the conscious choice to grow from taking pictures to creating high-quality artistic photographs. This happens when we can become still, really see the subject, see the final image in our imagination and then use our craft skills to make that vision real. This is a process that Ansel Adams and many of the great photographers have used for many decades which was then called Visualization.  Just as Adams worked on his images in the darkroom and we now have of Photoshop to explore our seemingly limitless creative possibilities.

This is the first of a series of Mindfulness / Visualization MeetUps.  Because space is very limited - ten people,  I am charging a nominal fee, $20.00, for this MeetUp.  Each participant is expected to post at least one image from the day on the MeetUp page. Each attendee should have a reasonable understanding of how to work their camera’s manual settings.

The first MeetUp will be at Green Gulch (http://sfzc.org/green-gulch) which is part of the San Francisco Zen Center.  Every person who signs up will be emailed a list of goals for that outing. When we arrive we will gather in the parking lot, discuss those goals for the day, techniques to begin the mindful process and then head out.  Once there we will have to be as quiet and unobtrusive as possible.  

Those who sign up for this workshop will be given first chance to sign up for the next workshop. Those who attend the first and second are given first chance for the third and so on. 

Subsequent outings will be the Bunkers at the Marin Headlands, Twilight at Sutro Baths, Muir Woods, Bolinas and Agate Beach, a Napa Adventure, a Sonoma County Adventure, and others yet to be imagined. 


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